Smartphone: writer’s friend or foe?

My phone, my constant companion, offers me some great tools, but is it really good for me?

I have been tracking my phone use with the Yourhour app for months now. Recently I switched off it’s tracking of certain apps like phone use, WordPress and Kindle app. The plan is I to hone in on where I “waste” time. The hours of use recorded are not quite as high.

I have a good excuse to ignore these stats. I read on my way to work which I think is a good use of two bus journeys. I talk to my mum for an hour every week or so, that one is essential. And I also turn off monitoring of my blog activity: this is my outlet, my glimpse into the world of new books and other creative people.

Only willing to share my morning stats!

But still, I worry when I see the figure so high. Hours of my day off last week glued to my phone. I know why, I needed a day to recover and chose to slouch in front of the tv, browsing the internet. I was tired after two nights out and knew I was up late to go to a friends leaving do. And did I mention I have been experiencing insomnia again.

Of course I have read much about sleep and screen time with regards to my little man. We are trying to reduce screens for a few hours before his bedtime but I do not give myself the same courtesy. I use a blue light filter and screen shade on my phone which should mitigate the effects of the screen before bed. But when my sleep is poor, I have regular headaches and my mood is effected by it all, can I really say this phone is my friend?

Well, maybe. Here are six great ways your phone is your writerly friend

1. Social Media Blogging, tweeting and on #BookBlogger Instagram is a fun place to be. Although social media does seem to suck up hours of your time, it will also give you the most amazing, tailored to-be-read pile. It helps you keep up with the industry, publishing trends, genres you love and meet great people who may even read your book one day.

The downside: not only do I get hooked on finding more people to follow, I get lost online. If you’re not careful, you never really interact with anyone at a deep level and have used up time you could be writing. Sometimes you have to admit to yourself Twitter is just procrastination.

2. Browse your manuscript. Twiddling with your manuscript if you pay for the Word app or at least keep notes on it is a good use of time I am sat in a traffic queue on the bus. It’s amazing the typos you spot when you revisit a scene for just a few minutes.

The downside: You can always change a verb in one sentence but I find I still haven’t got to the end. Work does need to be polished but do you need to work endlessly on one sentence, if you haven’t yet got a full draft?

3. Editing tools Grammarly is an essential add-on and I also had a version of the Hemingway App on my old phone. Both allow you to paste text in and check it. It’s always interesting what it can pick up that you may miss. Hemingway certainly tells me off for my adverbs and passive voice (haha). Like anything, you can take as much advice as you like but I think they are useful.

The downside: copying and pasting across work, creating an endless list of new drafts you’re working on because it contains the correction. It can get very confusing. Also, is Hemingway really my writing goal, I’m not sure I enjoy his work that much.

4. Voice memos a great way to write dialogue is to say it out loud, even better if you record a conversation. If you enjoy the acting part of writing, this is a great way to think about how intonation comes across in your writing. Can you give clues to their mood? The sisters in my novel argue a lot so this has been great way for me to develop their voices.

The downside: there may be things that just never get written up. Because of this I duplicate work. Also using memos when I am out and about means I have recordings ruined by ambulance sirens or I have stopped mid-sentence when I realise someone is coming the other way and they might think I am talking to myself.

5. Read more As I have mentioned, I consider the Kindle app an essential but what about all of those other interests I can pursue at random? Yes, we rely on Google and Wikipedia to learn about something quickly. I am really interested in Folklore so I flit through articles on this topic, littered too with interests of my son and my guilty pleasure: gossip from Bravo. Googles front page on my phone is certainly a strange mix. Some of this time reading may be considered more worthy than others but it’s also sparking ideas, I don’t know how I would cope without instantaneous information.

The downside: We all know the internet is full of unedited, unsourced ideas. It’s so wonderful having everything at our fingertips but it also requires a savvy approach to take in what you are reading and constantly filter the information. I love researching this way at the start of an idea, but honestly I see it as a jumping off point. Research into something I am writing about in more depth, I still think I need a library day.

6. Pinterest This is a good research tool too despite my above proviso, I love Pinterest for keeping my interests in one place. I am just setting up my business site but I have enjoyed the personal site for years. It is a great way to remember where you have put something on the internet. I also love to collect and post inspiring quotes.

The downside: again you can get lost at procrastination station. Like many places on the internet, it gives you false ideas of what you can achieve. Whether it’s beautiful bullet journals or cake decoration ideas that “nailed it” meme is just too accurate. If comparison is the thief of joy, then Pinterest may be the thief of your artistic self-esteem.

Given the pros and cons of using your phone to support your writing, I have been questioning how I can reduce my use and still enjoy the tools.

My plan is to try a digital and reading detox. Julia Cameron reccomends it in The Artist’s Way programme. Part of this will mean no Twitter, no Kindle, no Pinterest for a week. Reading only essential things like work emails. I will report back and let you know how it goes…

Have you ever tried a digital detox?

2 thoughts on “Smartphone: writer’s friend or foe?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.