Productivity Hacks and Where to Find Them

The search continues for productivity hacks for busy-brained people who have too much to do…

If you have always had a busy brain like me, distractable and often day-dreamy, you will probably have spent years looking for systems that help you “get things done” or “be more productive”. You probably have to work twice as hard to put the any suggestions in place – I can tell you with the added bonus of brain fog for the last 18 months, I have hard-won experience about just how tough this can be. Over the years, I have developed an insatiable appetite for the self-help books that help and here are the productivity hacks that have actually helped:

Steven Covey, The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People

This book is such a a classic though I haven’t read it since I was an impressionable teenager some of the habits have stuck. It’s definitely quite a dense management-speak book that couldn’t solve all my problems but there is one hack that has stuck – the importance matrix. You probably know to always write a to do list: mine has too many things on it and some on there that “should have dones” that haunt me every time I look at this.

But I am having a tough time, I sit and make a matrix. In essence what Covey teaches you to do is to rank the most important and time-consuming tasks so that you get your priorities done first. When my brain is fuzzed with too many tasks to do, I still use this method after all these years to focus in on what’s got to get done first.

Graham Allcott: How to Be a Productivity Ninja

One book I think that runs alongside Covey’s book which helps you prioritise tasks is The Productivity Ninja. The section that stayed with me was both about knowing your best times of day but most importantly protect your attention. This means working in focus mode on my phone or putting a timer on to work solidly for that time. Now as you will know getting precious time alone with enough energy is my constant battle, but knowing that mornings are the times I can concentrate best and that I work well with instrumental music on helps me keep on task.

Greg McKeown, Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less

Essentialism was a book I have found quite recently. It actually seems more of a philosophy – a minimalism for your inner life and I enjoyed this introductory course on Skillshare (link not affiliated). Having thought through a lot of advice, it seems like he is asking you to design your life and I will share more on the project I am working on as part of the course in a future post. The general idea is to really identify not just your priorities but areas of your lives where you can improve so you are always moving in the direction. As part of this work, you really have to identify your boundaries and so that you really are focusing on what is essential.

Manoush Zomodori: Bored and Brilliant: How Time Spent Doing Nothing Changes Everything

I have written my account of trying a bored and brilliant project before. The ideas that have really stuck is taking breaks from our phone. She forces you to go on your commute without your phone or go for a quiet walk. What a revelation that we can cope without the modern crutch. The most difficult part is you might feel weird being the only one looking around, not down at your phone. As well as giving you a break, it allows your restless brain to work and often ideas will form. It may seem the opposite of being productive to let your mind wander, but our problem solving mechanism works hard for us and although I do still often have the crutch of my phone, I am much more aware of taking time without it.

Nir Eyal, Indistractable: How to Control your Attention and Choose your Life

The final book I have found helpful has some startling evidence to share about the impact of social media and the instant access of information on our attention. The message I take from this book, apart from making me horrified about my screen time, is that we need to be aware when we are trying to escape.

Most people don’t want to acknowledge the uncomfortable truth that distraction is always an unhealthy escape from reality

Nir Eyal, Indistractable

For me I acknowledge I need these breaks, often into fiction or even writing itself. The hard disciplined work of being indistractable is not easy but will undoubtedly improve your productivity.

The fatigue recovery that I have had to undertake has taught me a lot about just how much energy focusing and using our brain takes. I am not yet at my full capacity but so much improved now I can see how important it is to be aware of how we spend our attention. As well as using these hacks, I would say we also need to balance. We need these hard and focused moments to work effectively in the time we have but also those things that give us a break.

Have you read any productivity books you think will help?

5 thoughts on “Productivity Hacks and Where to Find Them

  1. Claudia,
    Thanks for the rundown on the books. I used to have Seven Habits and have tried to read it, got bored early on, didn’t read it and I think I donated it. Hopefully, someone else will get more out of it than I did. I probably have the seven worst habits of whatever you can think. Time is limited and there’s so much to fit in. Throw in things like brain fog (which I too suffer from), too much stress, a ton of distraction, plus I have ADHD. The older I get, the less I seem to be able to complete. I’m currently working on a book while spinning in circles. Perhaps I need to set it aside for a bit and focus on something else. I don’t know. You mentioned The Artist’s Way in a different post and I love that book. I try to write my morning pages daily. I’ve been derailed of late…nothing new there. I’m reading fewer self-help books these days, focusing more on humorists, which is what I try and write. Of course, I read a ton of blogs as well. You’re my new favorite! 🙂 Mona

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    1. I can relate to your experience a lot! I definitely take the best bits from the self help books and leave the rest. I think knowing that I have difficulty in the areas of organisation and attention has driven me to seek for more and more advice.

      Thank you for liking and commenting on my blog 😊

      I’ll be updating you on how I get on with Essentialism soon ~ Claudia

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I am always reading productivity hack books – They are a wonderful way to make me feel like I’m doing something when actually, I am not. The list, the completion, it’s the only thing that works for me.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m starting my time blocking attempt this week! Had to make a list of main activities I need to achieve (rather than the specifics) Have to see how it goes and how much I have overestimated my time!

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